Automatic Employment Authorization Document (EAD) Extension

Certain renewal applicants who have filed Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization, qualify for an automatic extension of their expiring employment authorization and/or EADs while their application is pending. You qualify for this extension if you:

  • Properly filed Form I-765 for a renewal of your employment authorization and/or EAD before your current EAD expired, and
  • Are otherwise eligible for a renewal, which means that:
    • Your renewal application is under a category that is eligible for an automatic extension (see the list of categories below); and
    • The Category on your current EAD matches the “Class Requested” listed on your Form I-797C Notice of Action, Receipt Notice. (Note: If you are a Temporary Protected Status (TPS) beneficiary or pending applicant, your EAD and this Notice must contain either the A12 or C19 category, but the categories do not need to match each other. In addition, for H-4, E, and L-2 dependent spouses, an unexpired Form I-94 indicating H-4, E, or L-2 nonimmigrant status (including E-1S, E-2S, E-3S, and L-2S class of admission codes) must accompany Form I-797C when presenting proof of employment authorization to an employer for Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, purposes).

Automatic Extension Time Period—Temporary Increase to up to 540 Days

Normally, DHS regulations provide for an automatic extension period of up to 180 days from the expiration date stated on the EAD. However, DHS has published a temporary final rule increasing the extension period. Effective May 4, 2022, DHS is temporarily increasing the extension period and providing up to 360 days of the additional automatic extension time, for a total of up to 540 days, to eligible renewal applicants. The automatic extension time is counted from the expiration date of the employment authorization and/or EAD. This temporary increase is available to eligible renewal applicants with pending applications if you filed your Form I-765 renewal application either:

  • Before May 4, 2022, and your 180-day automatic extension has since expired;
  • Before May 4, 2022, and your 180-day automatic extension has not yet expired; or
  • Between May 4, 2022, and Oct. 26, 2023, inclusive of these dates.

If you file your Form I-765 renewal application after Oct. 26, 2023, the normal 180-day automatic extension period will apply.

Proof of an Automatic Extension

The automatic extension period, including the temporary increase to the extension period, is provided to certain renewal applicants to help prevent gaps in employment authorization and documentation.

If you file a Form I-765 renewal application on or after May 4, 2022, USCIS will send you a Form I-797C Notice of Action receipt notice that has information regarding the up to 540-day automatic extension. If you are eligible for the automatic extension, this receipt notice, together with your expired EAD (and your unexpired Form I-94, if you are an H-4, E, or L-2 dependent spouse, including E-1S, E-2S, E-3S, and L-2S class of admission codes) will serve as acceptable proof of employment authorization and/or EAD validity during the up to 540-day automatic extension period.

If you filed a Form I-765 renewal application before May 4, 2022, you should have received a Form I-797C Notice of Action receipt notice that describes the automatic extension period of up to 180 days. You will not receive a new I-797C receipt notice reflecting the increased employment authorization and/or EAD automatic extension period. However, Form I-797C receipt notices that refer to an up to 180-day automatic extension will still meet the regulatory requirements for completing Form I-9, including if your 180-day automatic extension expired prior to May 4, 2022.

For information about automatic extension of Employment Authorization, contact our office at (212)258-0713.

Foreign Nurse Visas

  • U.S. hospitals seek foreign nurses amid visa windfall. Since the pandemic, American hospitals have been facing a shortage of nurses, leading many hospitals looking abroad for healthcare workers. The U.S. has an unusually high number of green cards available this year for foreign professionals, including nurses. The burnout from working during the pandemic has led many U.S. nurses to retire or leave their jobs. The high number of covid-19 cases has also placed tremendous pressure on the healthcare system. USCIS said it would quicken the renewal of work permits for health care workers, which could help keep some foreign citizens in the U.S. on the job. Last year, the State Department told consulates to prioritize applications for workers at facilities that respond to the pandemic.

    As a Foreign Nurse, Can I Work in the U.S. Temporarily?

    If you are a foreign nurse and want to work in the U.S. on a temporary basis (without receiving a U.S. green card), you might be able to obtain an H-1B visa. An H-1B is a popular temporary work visa for foreign nationals who have a job offer from a U.S. employer to work in a “specialty occupation.”

    Can I Obtain a U.S. Green Card as a Foreign Nurse?

    Your U.S. employer might also be willing to sponsor you for a green card. The employer must first offer you a full-time, permanent nurse position. Second, your employer must complete a process known as “labor certification” on your behalf (more commonly referred to as PERM). Now, you might have heard a lot about the PERM/labor certification process, with all its advertising requirements, but this process is completely different (and easier) for nurse positions.

    A nurse position is classified as a “Schedule A” position. Schedule A positions are ones that the U.S. government has recognized the U.S. needs more workers to fill. Therefore, employers are not required to post advertisements for Schedule A positions (a usual PERM requirement), because the U.S. government already knows there is a shortage of workers in these positions.

    For additional information on how to obtain a Foreign Nurse Visa, call Law Offices of Norka M. Schell, LLC at (212)258-0713.

USCIS Reaches H-2B Cap for First Half of FY 2020

Release Date: 
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services has reached the congressionally mandated cap on H-2B visas for temporary nonagricultural workers for the first half of fiscal year 2020.

Nov. 15 was the final receipt date for new cap-subject H-2B worker petitions requesting an employment start date before April 1, 2020. USCIS will reject new cap-subject H-2B petitions received after Nov. 15 that request an employment start date before April 1, 2020.

USCIS continues to accept H-2B petitions that are exempt from the congressionally mandated cap. This includes the following types of petitions:

  • Current H-2B workers in the U.S. petitioning to extend their stay and, if applicable, change the terms of their employment or change their employers;
  • Fish roe processors, fish roe technicians, and/or supervisors of fish roe processing; and
  • Workers performing labor or services in the Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands and/or Guam from Nov. 28, 2009, until Dec. 31, 2029.

U.S. businesses use the H-2B program to employ foreign workers for temporary nonagricultural jobs. Currently, Congress has set the H-2B cap at 66,000 per fiscal year, with 33,000 for workers who begin employment in the first half of the fiscal year (Oct.1 – March 31) and 33,000 (plus any unused numbers from the first half of the fiscal year) for workers who begin employment in the second half of the fiscal year (April 1 – Sept. 30).

For more information, H-2B petitioners can visit the Cap Count for H-2B Nonimmigrants page.

 

Social Security Number for Immigrants

Temporary workers and those in non-immigrant visa status who are authorized to work in the United States by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) can get a Social Security number (SSN).

Social Security numbers are used to report wages to the government and to determine a person’s eligibility for Social Security benefits. A Social Security number is needed to work and to collect Social Security benefits.

Only non-citizens authorized to work in the US are eligible for a Social Security number.

Those on non-employment based temporary visas (like ESTA) without work authorization are not permitted to apply for social security number.

How to Get a Social Security Number (SSN)

There are two ways that you can get a social security number and card:

  1. If you are age 18 or older, you can apply for a social security number in your home country when you apply for an immigrant visa with the U.S. Department of State. The U.S. government will use the same information that you give to apply for an immigrant visa to apply for an SSN.

Your social security card will arrive at your mailing address about three weeks after you arrive in the US. If you apply for the Social Security number outside of the U.S., you do not have to visit an American Social Security office after entry into the United States.

  1. If you are not an immigrant or did not apply for a Social Security number when you applied for an immigrant visa, you must bring your petition and approval notices showing your legal immigration status and approved authorization to work in the United States. Then you should apply for a Social Security number and card by visiting a Social Security office in the U.S.

The Social Security Administration recommends that you wait ten days after arriving in the country to “make it easier for us to verify your Department of Homeland Security documents online, which will speed processing of your Social Security number application.” Applying for a Social Security number is free.

Information Required to Get a Social Security Card

  • Application for A Social Security Card (Form SS-5)
  • Two original documents proving your identity, immigration status, work eligibility, and age.

As far as documentation, for example, a work permit can be used as proof of both your identity and work-authorized immigration status. Some other acceptable documents to prove your work authorization can include your immigrant visa, an employment-based admission stamp, the I-94 Arrival/Departure Record, and any work permits or Employment Authorization Documents (EAD).

Your birth certificate or passport may serve as proof of age. However, you need two separate documents to prove eligibility for a social security number.

Temporary workers and those in non-immigrant visa status who are authorized to work in the United States by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) can get a Social Security number (SSN).

Social Security numbers are used to report wages to the government and to determine a person’s eligibility for Social Security benefits. A Social Security number is needed to work and to collect Social Security benefits.

Only non-citizens authorized to work in the US are eligible for a Social Security number.

Those on non-employment based temporary visas (like ESTA) without work authorization are not permitted to apply for social security numbers.

How to Get a Social Security Number (SSN)

There are two ways that you can get a social security number and card:

  1. If you are age 18 or older, you can apply for a social security number in your home country when you apply for an immigrant visa with the U.S. Department of State. The U.S. government will use the same information that you give to apply for an immigrant visa to apply for an SSN.

Your social security card will arrive at your mailing address about three weeks after you arrive in the US. If you apply for the Social Security number outside of the U.S., you do not have to visit an American Social Security office after entry into the United States.

  1. If you are not an immigrant or did not apply for a Social Security number when you applied for an immigrant visa, you must bring your petition and approval notices showing your legal immigration status and approved authorization to work in the United States. Then you should apply for a Social Security number and card by visiting a Social Security office in the U.S.

The Social Security Administration recommends that you wait ten days after arriving in the country to “make it easier for us to verify your Department of Homeland Security documents online, which will speed processing of your Social Security number application.” Applying for a Social Security number is free.

Information Required to Get a Social Security Card

  • Application for A Social Security Card (Form SS-5)
  • Two original documents proving your identity, immigration status, work eligibility, and age.

As far as documentation, for example, a work permit can be used as proof of both your identity and work-authorized immigration status. Some other acceptable documents to prove your work authorization can include your immigrant visa, an employment-based admission stamp, the I-94 Arrival/Departure Record, and any work permits or Employment Authorization Documents (EAD).

Your birth certificate or passport may serve as proof of age. However, you need two separate documents to prove eligibility for a social security number. See https://secure.ssa.gov/ICON/main.jsp

By: Alison Doyle posted 09/03/2019 at on www.balancecareer.com